Cheryl Caldwell - William Raveis - The Dolores Person Group



Posted by Cheryl Caldwell on 4/19/2019

A common problem among homeowners is the reality that life is unpredictable. There are so many things and so many issues that may come along the way. Owning a house can be both an asset and a liability if it does not get done right. 

Can I Sell My Property Even If It Is On Mortgage? 

Yes, you may sell your property even if it is on the mortgage. 

You may opt to sell it because you got your best luck and you are moving before the end of the original mortgage contract.

You may also decide to sell if you own a property, but you are going through some financial difficulty, you may either refinance your home and make use of the equity or sell your house and downgrade to a smaller one or lease an apartment. We have all been there, and the truth of the matter is that every person who has come face to face with financial difficulty should have a guide on how they can go about selling the property. 

How To Sell Your Property On Mortgage

The following are the steps to take:

1. Meet with a professional real estate listing agent. Tell them your situation and they will help you find out your current mortgage payoff. Once this information is available, you will figure out the following items:

- Your current borrowing situation;

- How much your asking price needs to be for you to be able to pay off the remaining loan balance; and...

- The probability of making some money out of the sale.

2. Once you have all the information, the real estate agent can go ahead and make a sale. Afterward, you get to discuss how you are going to get some value off the purchase.

What If The Property Value Is Less Than What I Owe? 

If you owe more than what you are going to make from the sale, you can talk to a bank to make a short sale. You can read more about that in this article.

Final Word

You can follow the above steps and sell your property even if it is on the mortgage. It will take maturity to handle a financial difficulty that forces your hand to sell your house, even if it is not yours yet. It also takes a lot of luck to be able to move to a more prominent place long before you paid off your last mortgage. What matters at this point is to contact a real estate agent and help you get through with the sale without any glitches.




Categories: Real estate   Mortgage   homebuyers  


Posted by Cheryl Caldwell on 3/29/2019

As a home seller, it is essential to do everything possible to promote your house to the right groups of property buyers. However, as you approach the finish line of a home sale, you may encounter a "persistent" homebuyer. And if this happens, the home selling process may come to a screeching halt.

A persistent homebuyer may be more likely than others to demand home improvements or a price reduction to finalize a house sale. As a result, you may need to decide whether to accommodate this homebuyer's requests, continue to negotiate with him or her or walk away from a potential home sale altogether.

So what does it take to deal with a persistent homebuyer? Here are three tips to help you do just that.

1. Understand the Housing Market

Are a homebuyer's requests valid? If so, they are likely to be based on housing market data. Therefore, if you analyze the housing market closely, you can better understand a persistent homebuyer's demands and proceed accordingly.

Take a look at the prices of comparable houses in your city or town. By doing so, you can determine how your house's price rates against the competition.

Also, don't forget to assess the prices of recently sold homes in your area. This housing market data will help you understand the demand for houses in your city or town and determine whether you're operating in a seller's or buyer's market.

2. Stand Your Ground

A persistent homebuyer may be in a hurry to purchase your house. As such, he or she may push you to make rash decisions that may not be in your best interest.

For home sellers, it is important to take a step back and evaluate all aspects of any home selling decisions. And if you feel uncomfortable with a homebuyer's requests, you should feel comfortable walking away from a possible home sale.

Ultimately, declining a homebuyer's requests and walking away from a home sale is far from ideal. On the other hand, doing so will allow you to reenter the housing market and restart the home selling journey with a fresh perspective.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

If you're unsure about how to deal with a persistent homebuyer, you're probably not alone. Lucky for you, real estate agents are available nationwide to help you handle tough negotiations with any homebuyer, at any time.

A real estate agent understands the art of negotiation and can share his or her housing market expertise with you. That way, you can get the support you need to make informed decisions at each stage of the home selling journey.

Perhaps best of all, a real estate agent will respond to your home selling queries as the property selling journey progresses. No question is too big or too small for a real estate agent, and this housing market professional is happy to answer your home selling questions time and time again.

Take the guesswork out of dealing with a persistent homebuyer Ė use these tips, and you can boost your chances of getting the best results from the home selling journey.





Posted by Cheryl Caldwell on 2/8/2019

Finding your new home is an exciting new prospect, and you want to ensure you get the home you really want. Before you start your home-search take some time to thoroughly consider what you want and need out of a home, what you want it to look like and what features you desire in your neighborhood and the surrounding area. To get you started, here are some pointers for creating your ideal home checklist.

Home Features

  • Basic Requirements. What do you need in a house? Take inventory of your household needs and belongings to determine your basic desires, outside of the obvious roof over your head, running water and electricity. If you have multiple children, do you want them to have their own rooms? Do they need a bathroom they can share? Does your elderly parent live with you and need a ground floor room with easy access to the kitchen and living spaces? Maybe youíre a single professional or young couple focused on starting a new business, so space for a home office or workshop is at the top of the list. Number of rooms, bathrooms, size of the yard, features and layout of the kitchen, storage space and number, size or openness of living areas are all things to consider when developing your needs list.
  • Desires. What do you want in a house? Separating needs and wants can be difficult when dreaming of your new home. Start with the big and more obvious ones, like a pool or built-in barbecue, crown molding or a chefís kitchen. You can add many features that you want after the fact. You can install a pool, replace the sliding door with French doors and even add your own crown molding. Setting aside some wants initially can open up your budget to purchasing a home that you can then invest more funds in and install most of the features you want. If youíre not interested in putting additional work into the house once you move in it is helpful to see what features bring up the cost of your new home so you can start thinking about what you can live without when it comes down to crunching numbers and staying within your means.
  • Take it or leave it. You have your list now consider what items you entirely canít live without (from the want or need category) and what you can be more flexible on. Unless youíre building a home from scratch with the perfect budget to boot, you will have to be flexible when searching for your home. Not every house will have every single feature on your list. Is it the master bath with his and her sinks that you need? Is it a big yard with a tree perfect for your kidís treehouse, or is it a multi-story home with den and living room that are your most sought-after features? Finally, determine which features to keep on the list to help with future resale value, even if they arenít on your initial needs or wants lists.
  • Resale Potential. The things you arenít thinking of. Where does potential resale value fit into your overall home buying plan? You might love a home with vintage French windows, but a house with dual-pane windows might add more value to the home when you try to sell it later. Maybe you donít care about hardwood floors, or you arenít thinking about ample built-in storage space, but your future buyers are, and you have the opportunity to invest now in added value later. When you review your ideal home checklist with your real estate agent ask for advice on how your needs and preferences align with a future resale. 

Before you start your home search or dive too deep into online listings work with your real estate agent to hammer out your ideal home checklist. Once you know what you desire in a home start working with your agent to find the best area for you to live in, read on to part two of this article to create your ideal neighborhood checklist.