Cheryl Caldwell - William Raveis - The Dolores Person Group



Posted by Cheryl Caldwell on 1/11/2019

In a competitive housing market--like the one we have today--sellers are fielding numerous offers, especially in desirable urban and suburban hubs.

If youíre hoping to buy your first or second home, it can be tough to make offer after offer with no success.

However, there are some things you can do to help ensure your time house hunting is well-spent and to increase your chances of getting your offer accepted.

In todayís post, Iím going to give you a few tips on how to win a bidding war on your dream home.

All-cash offer

The most effective way to ensure that your offer is accepted is to make it in all cash. Cash offers drastically simplify the real estate transaction process, making things easier on the seller.

Most buyers, especially first-time buyers, wonít be able to make an all-cash offer on a home. However, people who are downsizing after their children moved out or are buying a retirement home may find themselves in the ideal financial situation to be able to leverage a cash offer.

If that sounds like you, consider a cash offer as part of your bidding strategy.

Waive the financing contingency

If youíre new to real estate contracts, you might be wondering what a contingency is. Essentially, a contingency is an action that needs to be completed before the contract becomes valid and the sale becomes final.

There are a number of different contingencies that can be found in a real estate contract. However, the most popular are for inspections, appraisals, and financing.

If youíre planning on taking out a mortgage to purchase the home, a financing contingency protects you in case you arenít able to secure the mortgage in time. In other words, youíre not on the hook for a home you canít pay for.

In some special situations, buyers might decide to waive the financing contingency, signaling to the sellers that there wonít be any hang-ups or delays from the buyer regarding financing the home.

Waiving this contingency comes with risks (namely, being responsible for coming up with the money to pay for the home). However, there are ways to safely waive a contingency.

The most common approach is to get a fully pre-approved letter from a lender. The important distinction here is that your mortgage needs to be pre-approved and underwritten (not just pre-qualified), otherwise you again risk getting denied the mortgage in the last moments before buying your home.

Crafting a personal letter

Sometimes all it takes to win a bidding war is to be the sellerís favorite candidate. Take the time to write them a personalized letter. Explain what you love about their home and why itís perfect for your family.

Avoid talking about big changes youíll make. Remember that they probably put a lot of time and money into the home, making it exactly the way they want it, and wonít appreciate you making huge plans to undo their work as soon as theyíre out the door.


Using one, or a combination of, these three techniques, youíll be able to give yourself an edge over the competition and increase your chances of getting your offer accepted.





Posted by Cheryl Caldwell on 11/16/2018

In real estate, cash is power. Itís not exactly the amount of money that you have been approved for by a lender. This type of ďcashĒ is what you can pull directly from your account to buy a property on demand. It can be difficult to compete with cash buyers especially in tight real estate markets. Below, youíll find some tips to help you match up against any cash offers that you may be competing with when you buy a home. 


Make Your Offer Look Attractive As Possible


First, you should always have a pre-approval letter from your lender. This lets sellers know that youíre a qualified buyer. You should also get your lender or realtor (or both) to provide some financial information about you along with your offer. This helps to add to the case that youíre a dependable buyer.


Let Things Move Quickly 



If you allow your lender to send an appraiser to the property as quickly as possible, this will give you an advantage in the home buying process. You want to reduce the amount of time that it will take to close on the house. That means you should consider cutting down on both the appraisal and contingency time. You could even consider waiving any contingencies if you feel comfortable. 


To speed up the process, even more, you should pre-order an appraisal in advance. You can do this before your offer has even been written. It can be difficult to arrange this, especially with larger scale lenders, but itís always worth a try. Once the offer is written, the lender can relay to the seller that an appraisal has already been scheduled.


Youíll also want to get the inspection done fairly quickly. You only have a short window of time to get the inspection done. The quicker you get this done, the more serious of a buyer you appear to be. You should have the inspector who youíll use ready before you even put an offer in on a home in order to expedite this part of the process. Usually, inspectors donít take terribly long to schedule appointments knowing that their clients have short windows to get inspections done.  


Make A Strong Offer


Making a good offer could mean paying extra for a home you love in order to compete with cash offers. Spending more money helps to win. Hereís why: Sellers almost always will give a cash buyer a bit more of a discount since theyíll be getting all of the funds up front. If you love the house and plan to live in it for years to come, the extra money you spend will be well worth it.         


Write An Offer Letter


An offer letter adds a bit of a personal touch to the number you put down as a buyer. Here, you can tell the seller who you are and why you love the home. It can be emotional to sell a property, but a seller will feel more comfortable knowing that the home is going to someone who will appreciate it.

  






Categories: Mortgage  


Posted by Cheryl Caldwell on 8/31/2018

If you get an offer to buy your house, there is no need to make a snap decision. Instead, it generally is a good idea to allocate the necessary time and resources to analyze an offer and determine the best course of action.

Ultimately, there are lots of reasons why you should analyze a home offer, and these include:

1. You can boost the likelihood of getting the best price for your house.

An offer may fall at, above or below your house's initial asking price. However, regardless of the offer that you receive, it pays to perform a full evaluation to ensure you can maximize the value of your residence.

For many home sellers, it is beneficial to conduct a home appraisal prior to listing a residence. That way, when a home offer arrives, a seller can compare the proposal to a property valuation and proceed accordingly.

2. You can weigh the pros and cons of all of your options.

Let's face it Ė deciding whether to accept, reject or counter a homebuying proposal can be tough. Luckily, analyzing an offer enables you to weight the pros and cons of each option, making it easier than ever before to make an informed choice.

Oftentimes, creating a list of pros and cons can be helpful. This list will enable you to assess the advantages and disadvantages of each potential home selling decision. Then, you can use your list to guide the decision-making process.

3. You can receive expert housing market insights before you finalize your decision.

Imagine what it would be like to take a data-driven approach to decide whether to approve a homebuying proposal. Now, you can, thanks to the wealth of housing market data that is readily available to sellers.

As a home seller, you should have no trouble examining the prices of comparable houses that recently sold in your city or town. You then can use this housing market data to determine whether a proposal is "fair" based on the current real estate market's conditions.

Of course, as you assess a home offer, it often helps to collaborate with a real estate agent. This housing market professional knows exactly what it takes to sell a house Ė regardless of the real estate market's conditions. As such, he or she will enable you to conduct an in-depth review of any homebuying proposal, at any time.

A real estate agent also is happy to help you after you determine whether to accept, reject or counter a proposal. If you accept an offer, a real estate agent will help you move forward with the home selling journey. Or, if you reject an offer, a real estate agent will show you how to promote your house to potential buyers to boost your chances of receiving better proposals in the future. And if you counter an offer, a real estate agent can negotiate with a buyer's agent on your behalf.

Evaluate a home offer closely Ė you'll be glad you did. If you perform a deep analysis of a homebuying proposal, you can assess a home offer from multiple angles and make the best-possible decision based on your individual needs.





Posted by Cheryl Caldwell on 8/17/2018

You recently listed your home on the real estate market, and now, you've received your first offer. However, you only have a short period of time to review the proposal and accept, reject or counter it. Determining how to handle an offer on your home can be challenging. Fortunately, we're happy to help you fully evaluate an offer so you can make an informed decision. There are numerous factors to consider as you review an offer on your house, including: 1. Price In some cases, homebuyers may submit a "lowball" offer in the hopes of getting a seller to jump at a quick sale. If a home seller accepts this offer, a homebuyer is able to purchase a terrific home at a bargain price. Conversely, if a home seller rejects or counters the offer, a homebuyer may have an opportunity to reconsider his or her options. As a home seller, you should consider how much you are willing to accept for your residence before you add it to the real estate market. By doing so, you can list your home for a fair price and act quickly and effectively as you receive offers. Also, flexibility is paramount for home sellers. And even though you may list your home for a particular price, you may want to consider accepting an offer below your initial asking price if you're looking for a quick sale. 2. Sale of a Buyer's Home Although a homebuyer may submit an offer that is at or above your initial asking price, the proposal may have strings attached that could slow down the home selling process. For instance, a homebuyer could make an offer that is contingent upon him or her selling a residence within a set period of time. But if this homebuyer is unable to sell his or her house, your home sale could fall through, which could cost you both time and money. In this scenario, consider your options carefully. If you believe you can receive other offers from homebuyers who don't require this contingency, you may be better off rejecting or countering the proposal. 3. Your Timeline If you've already secured a new home and need to sell your current residence as quickly as possible, you may want to consider accepting an offer even if it is below your initial asking price. On the other hand, if you are able to afford two mortgages for an extended period of time, you may be better equipped to wait out a slow real estate market. When it comes to determining whether to accept an offer on your residence, consulting with your real estate agent usually is a great idea. This professional can offer expert resources you might struggle to find elsewhere and empower you with the insights you need to make the best decision possible. Consider the aforementioned factors as you evaluate an offer on your home, and you should be able to accept, reject or counter a proposal with confidence.





Posted by Cheryl Caldwell on 1/26/2018

Shopping for a home is a long, arduous process. When you finally find one that you love, think you can afford, and spend the time to formulate an offer, it can be crushing when your offer is rejected.

However, getting rejected is simply part of the process. If youíve ever applied to college, you might be familiar with this process. You send out applications that you poured your heart and soul into. Sometimes to get accepted, other times you donít.

Making an offer on a home comes with one big advantage over those college applications, however--the opportunity to negotiate. As long as the house is still on the market after your offer is rejected, youíre still in the game.

In this article, weíre going to talk you through what to do when your offer is rejected so you can reformulate your plan and make the best decision as to moving forward.

1. Donít sweat it

One of the most common fallacies we fall into as humans is to think the outcome is worse than it really is. First, remember that there are most likely other houses out there that are as good if not better than the one you are bidding on, even if theyíre not for sale at this moment.

Next, consider the rejection as simply part of the negotiation process. Most people are turned off by rejection. However, you can learn a lot when a seller says no. In many cases, you can take what you learned and return to the drawing board to come up with a better offer.

Donít spend too much time scrutinizing the sellerís decision. Ninety-nine percent of the time their decision isnít personal. You simply havenít met the pricing or contractual requirements that they and their agent have decided on.

2. Reconsider your offer

Now itís time to start thinking about a second offer. If the seller didnít respond with a counteroffer it can mean one of two things. First, they might be considering other buyers who have gotten closer to their requirements. Alternatively, your offer may have been too low or have had too many contingencies for them to consider.

Regardless, a flat-out rejection usually means changes need to be made before following up.

3. Making a new offer

This is your chance to take what you learned and apply it to your new offer. Make sure you meet the following prerequisites before sending out your next offer:

  • Double check your financing. Understand your spending limits, both on paper and in terms of what youíre comfortable spending.

  • Check comparable houses. If houses in the neighborhood are selling for more than they were when the house was previously listed, the seller might be compensating for that change.

  • Make sure youíre pre-approved. Your offer will be taken more seriously if you have the bankís approval.

  • Remove unnecessary contingencies. Itís a sellerís market. Having a complicated contract will make sellers less likely to consider your offer.

4. Move on with confidence

Sometimes you just canít make it up to the sellerís price point. Other times the seller just canít come to terms with a reasonable price for their home. Regardless, donít waste too much time negotiating and renegotiating. Take what you learned from this experience and use it toward the next house negotiation--it will be here sooner than you think!







Tags