Cheryl Caldwell - William Raveis - The Dolores Person Group



Posted by Cheryl Caldwell on 2/15/2019

Once you are a homeowner, you now are responsible for all the maintenance on your property. How often and what time of year to do any of those maintenance or repairs can be a mystery if you have never owned a detached single-family home before. Creating a schedule for all those things that you need to check on around the property and inside your home may be helpful. Keeping a repair/maintenance journal to track projects can give you peace of mind. This schedule, or journal, can be a simple handwritten notebook or spreadsheet saved on your computer.

Keeping up the Outside 

Your roof, siding, and fences take on all the year-round weather; visually inspect each of them at least once a year. According to NAHB, the National Association of Home Builders, your roof should be examined by a qualified roofer once every three years. Keeping any landscaping from rubbing up against the siding and cleaning the siding once a year helps to prolong the life of the materials. Fences in good working order secure your property and maintain curb appeal. Gutters and your downspouts need to be kept clear to work properly; so, they may require more frequent inspections during the year to ensure they are functioning well. In-ground sprinkler systems can experience cracked water lines in hard freezes. Sprinklers can also get damaged by lawn mowers or weed trimmers so test the system before winter set in and at the beginning of the watering season to ensure the system is in good repair. Larger trees and shrubs that are vulnerable to damaging property in inclement weather conditions so, keeping them healthy and trimmed can prevent possible damage. 

Keeping up the Inside

Furnace, air ducts, dryer vents, these all need to have regular inspections and maintenance done. The interior items can be checked on anytime during the year but having a consistent routine increases the chance those checks get completed. Checking the batteries on your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors once a month is good but, actually testing them is better. Have an annual chimney checkup from a professional to give you the all clear for those fireplaces. Larger appliances may need occasional checkups to keep them running efficiently. Keeping the mechanics of your home at optimal operating condition will not only provide for the longevity of that appliance but save you money on your utility bills.





Posted by Cheryl Caldwell on 2/8/2019

Finding your new home is an exciting new prospect, and you want to ensure you get the home you really want. Before you start your home-search take some time to thoroughly consider what you want and need out of a home, what you want it to look like and what features you desire in your neighborhood and the surrounding area. To get you started, here are some pointers for creating your ideal home checklist.

Home Features

  • Basic Requirements. What do you need in a house? Take inventory of your household needs and belongings to determine your basic desires, outside of the obvious roof over your head, running water and electricity. If you have multiple children, do you want them to have their own rooms? Do they need a bathroom they can share? Does your elderly parent live with you and need a ground floor room with easy access to the kitchen and living spaces? Maybe youíre a single professional or young couple focused on starting a new business, so space for a home office or workshop is at the top of the list. Number of rooms, bathrooms, size of the yard, features and layout of the kitchen, storage space and number, size or openness of living areas are all things to consider when developing your needs list.
  • Desires. What do you want in a house? Separating needs and wants can be difficult when dreaming of your new home. Start with the big and more obvious ones, like a pool or built-in barbecue, crown molding or a chefís kitchen. You can add many features that you want after the fact. You can install a pool, replace the sliding door with French doors and even add your own crown molding. Setting aside some wants initially can open up your budget to purchasing a home that you can then invest more funds in and install most of the features you want. If youíre not interested in putting additional work into the house once you move in it is helpful to see what features bring up the cost of your new home so you can start thinking about what you can live without when it comes down to crunching numbers and staying within your means.
  • Take it or leave it. You have your list now consider what items you entirely canít live without (from the want or need category) and what you can be more flexible on. Unless youíre building a home from scratch with the perfect budget to boot, you will have to be flexible when searching for your home. Not every house will have every single feature on your list. Is it the master bath with his and her sinks that you need? Is it a big yard with a tree perfect for your kidís treehouse, or is it a multi-story home with den and living room that are your most sought-after features? Finally, determine which features to keep on the list to help with future resale value, even if they arenít on your initial needs or wants lists.
  • Resale Potential. The things you arenít thinking of. Where does potential resale value fit into your overall home buying plan? You might love a home with vintage French windows, but a house with dual-pane windows might add more value to the home when you try to sell it later. Maybe you donít care about hardwood floors, or you arenít thinking about ample built-in storage space, but your future buyers are, and you have the opportunity to invest now in added value later. When you review your ideal home checklist with your real estate agent ask for advice on how your needs and preferences align with a future resale. 

Before you start your home search or dive too deep into online listings work with your real estate agent to hammer out your ideal home checklist. Once you know what you desire in a home start working with your agent to find the best area for you to live in, read on to part two of this article to create your ideal neighborhood checklist.





Posted by Cheryl Caldwell on 2/5/2019


49 Turkey Hill Rd, West Newbury, MA 01985

Single-Family

$685,000
Price

9
Rooms
4
Beds
3
Baths
CALLING ALL BUILDERS, INVESTORS, CASH BUYERS - Opportunity calls! Assessed $900,100 and located on a gorgeous 6.75 acre parcel with panoramic vistas, this 1992 expanded Dutch Colonial suffered water damage from a frozen pipe resulting in 70% of 1st floor being gutted. Infrastructure of house and systems are rock solid. Flexible layout could work well for extended family with 2 separate living areas - 4 bedrooms (including spacious 1st floor bedroom), 3 baths, 1st floor Den/Living Room with fireplace and sliders to patio area as well as amazing Great Room over garage with full kitchen, stone fireplace and full length deck with views for miles. Features include 8 car heated drive-through garage (perfect for car enthusiast, contractor), lighted basketball/sport court, full house generator, central A/C, security system. Full unfinished basement. Irrigation, security systems. Seller to install 4 bedroom septic but otherwise property being sold AS IS. Buyers to rely on own due diligence.
Open House
Saturday
February 09 at 11:30 AM to 1:00 PM
Cannot make the Open Houses?
Location: 49 Turkey Hill Rd, West Newbury, MA 01985    Get Directions

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Categories: Open House  


Posted by Cheryl Caldwell on 2/5/2019


49 Turkey Hill Rd, West Newbury, MA 01985

Single-Family

$685,000
Price

9
Rooms
4
Beds
3
Baths
CALLING ALL BUILDERS, INVESTORS, CASH BUYERS - Opportunity calls! Assessed $900,100 and located on a gorgeous 6.75 acre parcel with panoramic vistas, this 1992 expanded Dutch Colonial suffered water damage from a frozen pipe resulting in 70% of 1st floor being gutted. Infrastructure of house and systems are rock solid. Flexible layout could work well for extended family with 2 separate living areas - 4 bedrooms (including spacious 1st floor bedroom), 3 baths, 1st floor Den/Living Room with fireplace and sliders to patio area as well as amazing Great Room over garage with full kitchen, stone fireplace and full length deck with views for miles. Features include 8 car heated drive-through garage (perfect for car enthusiast, contractor), lighted basketball/sport court, full house generator, central A/C, security system. Full unfinished basement. Irrigation, security systems. Seller to install 4 bedroom septic but otherwise property being sold AS IS. Buyers to rely on own due diligence.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

Similar Properties





Categories: New Homes  


Posted by Cheryl Caldwell on 2/1/2019

Purchasing your first home will be one of the most rewarding and fulfilling parts of your life. Itís an important milestone on the way to financial independence and to starting a family for millions of Americans.

It also comes with a lot of responsibilities and unforeseen expenses.

A Reddit user asked the online community what items ended up being useful to them that they didnít think about beforehand. The result was a ton of great advice for new or soon-to-be homeowners.

In todayís post, Iíve broken down the most useful items from all of their responses. So, if youíre going to be a

1. Information about past purchases

One user found that the most useful thing the previous owner left behind were a number of receipts for appliances that would be left in the house. In addition, they also left a list of model numbers for important parts like faucets, and list of all of the paint colors used in the house.

In addition, the previous homeowners even left a binder full of menus for local restaurants. While the seller of your next home might not think to leave behind all of this useful info for you, it doesnít hurt to ask in case they have some of that information saved that theyíll no longer need.

2. Ten thousand dollars

While this comment may be a bit tongue-in-cheek, it does illustrate an important fact for new homeowners: expect to spend some money. As the poster pointed out, there isnít necessarily one thing that youíll need. More likely, youíll find yourself running to the hardware store often for a number of small purchases.

Setting aside some money for these initial expenses is a good idea so that you can get the most out of your home in the first few months living in it without worrying about how or when youíre going to replace some of the many small, but annoying, fixes youíll experience in your new house.

3. A steel hand cart

From day one and onward, youíll be moving a lot of things around your home. Heavy objects like dressers, drawers, refrigerators, and other furniture and appliances will often require two people to move. Well, if you live alone or you and your spouse work different hours, it isnít always possible to have two people around to help lift and move something. To save time and prevent injury, having a dolly (A.K.A. a steel hard cart) on hand will make things easier.

4. Check your cell phone signal before moving day

In spite of the claims of the major cellular carriers, there are still many areas of the U.S. that have little or no reception. This can come as a shock on moving day if you havenít planned ahead.

Fortunately, you can purchase a device called a microcell to boost the cellular signal in your home, preventing dropped calls.

5. A Carbon monoxide and smoke detector, and fresh batteries

As much as you may trust the previous owners, thereís no way to be certain that there arenít any fire or CO hazards in the home that youíre unaware of. Getting new detectors, batteries, and installing them immediately will help you rest easy on your first night.




Categories: new homeowners   useful items  




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